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1937 Bugatti Type 57

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Blenheim, ON
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1937 Bugatti Type 57

To Be OFFERED AT AUCTION at RM Sothebys' Amelia Island event, 8 - 9 March 2019. Estimate:$6,000,000 - $7,500,000 One of eight Type 57S examples bodied by Corsica; only two four-seater tourersOnly 16 Type 57S Bugattis delivered with open coachworkKnown and fascinating ownership historyFormerly of the Judge North and General Lyons collectionsRetains its original chassis, engine, gearbox, and bodyDocumented in Pierre-Yves Laugier?s and Bernhard Simon and Julius Kruta?s seminal books on the model THE ULTIMATE EXPRESSION: TYPE 57SThe Paris Auto Salon of October 1936 marked a propitious crossroads for Alsatian manufacturer Bugatti. There, the company introduced a second-series iteration of their vaunted Type 57, the sporting road car designed by Ettore Bugatti?s son, Jean, that featured a 3.3-liter dual overhead-cam eight-cylinder engine and competition-inspired chassis. In addition to the second-series Type 57, Bugatti also unveiled two sporting variants of the model, the 57C and the 57S. While the former featured a supercharged engine (the C standing for compressor), the latter was an even more purpose-built sports car. In fact, it can be argued that the Type 57S is an entirely distinct model and might have more suitably had its own unique type designation to put things into clear perspective.The Type 57S was built upon a completely re-engineered chassis that was both shorter and lower (the S for surbaisse, French for ?lowered?). The front axle was articulated in halves, and the rear axle passed through the frame rather than under it for a lower overall stance. A magneto-driven ignition was mated to the specially tuned engine featuring a higher compression ratio of 8.5:1 and positioned low in the frame. A dry sump oiling system was added to accommodate for the engine?s lower center of gravity to achieve proper road clearance. This low-slung chassis was then fitted with an equally low-mounted radiator that wore a handsome V-shaped grille in the classic Bugatti motif for, as might be presumed, its aerodynamic effect at high speed.This potent combination added up to a significant increase in both horsepower and overall performance over the typical Type 57 engine and chassis. The 57S now boasted 175 hp versus the standard Type 57 output of 135 hp, and when adding the available ?C? specification Roots-type supercharger power output was raised to 200 hp. This enabled a top speed of some 120-mph, making Bugatti the fastest French production car of the period.The attributes of the Type 57S chassis were adapted for competition use, with an advertisement printed a year later in conjunction with the 1937 Paris Salon that demonstrated how successful the Type 57S was in racing in its first 12 months. Claiming three competition victories during 1936 (the French Grand Prix, La Marne Grand Prix, and the Commings Grand Prix), Bugatti?s greatest success on the track was soon to come when a groundbreaking aerodynamic version of the 57S called the 57G ?Tank? won the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 1937. In addition to achieving victories at the Pau Grand Prix, Bone Grand Prix, and La Marne Grand Prix that same year, the 57S set records at some 14 different types of events, including a speed average of 85.07 mph at Le Mans. An overall victory at Le Mans was later repeated by a second incarnation of the Tank in 1939.These achievements in mechanical design, engineering, and performance that evolved from lowering and shortening the chassis led to an additional benefit ? the 57S provided the perfect platform for some of the most stunning automotive shapes ever created. With the ability to lower the hood and roofline proportions on the S chassis, designers were able to dramatically change the entire profile of the coachwork when compared to the taller stance of the Type 57. Each example of the Type 57S built is a study in the art of coachbuilding, and chassis 57512 is no different.CORSICA COACHWORKSCorsica Coachworks was established at Kings Cross, London, in 1920 by Charles Stammers and his brothers-in-law, Joseph and Robert Lee. A relatively small operation, the firm claimed not to have employed designers, preferring instead to directly carry out its customers? devices and desires. Because Corsica was small and could intimately cater to its customers? whims, the workshop attracted many of the sporting crowd. While little is known of the early ?20s Corsica output, a good deal of it is believed to have involved Bentley.The early 1930s brought some of the best-known Corsica coachwork, including a low-slung sports body for the Double-Six 50 Daimler and an open two-seater for Donald Healey?s 1935 Triumph Dolomite, by which time the Works had moved to Cricklewood. For MG general manager Cecil Kimber, Corsica worked up a drophead coupe for a supercharged K-Type Magnette. In addition to traditional British marques Rolls-Royce, British Salmson, Frazer Nash, and Lea-Francis, Corsica also worked on Continental chassis, mainly Alfa Romeo and Mercedes-Benz. Later on, more than a dozen Type 57 Bugattis were bodied by Corsica, including a 57S roadster style body for Sir Malcolm Campbell, the Grand Prix driver and land-speed record holder ? and the monumental 57S roadster created for Colonel Giles, who affectionately referred to this masterpiece as ?La Petite Suzanne.? Like many of the bespoke builders, Corsica closed its doors during World War II, never to re-open.BUGATTI CHASSIS NUMBER 57512The Type 57S was introduced in late 1937, and just over 40 production examples were built in total. Most of these chassis were delivered with closed coachwork, such as the elegant Jean Bugatti penned Atalante coupe, not to mention his mind-blowing Atlantic design. Of total 57S production, only 16 examples were finished with open coachwork, making 57512 exceptionally rare and desirable by any standard.While most bodies were supplied by French coachbuilding firms such as Gangloff (a favorite for carrying out some of Jean?s best recognized designs), Vanvooren, or Bugatti?s own Works, British coachbuilders such as Vanden Plas and Corsica also applied their trade to the 57S with perhaps as many as 15 chassis slated for delivery to England.Corsica built a total of only eight bodies on the Type 57S chassis, including four two-seat roadster bodies (including the Sir Malcolm Campbell and La Petite Suzanne cars), two closed car bodies (of which one example no longer survives), and two four-seat tourer bodies. Chassis 57512 was the second four-seat tourer commissioned, with each being uniquely constructed to show obvious variations from one chassis to the other. The first chassis, no. 57503, abruptly ends the curve of the fenders just behind the wheels, while proudly displaying the oil tank just behind the left front wing. The example offered here extends the length of the fenders front and rear to gracefully hide the oil tank and visually lengthen the car for a dramatic finish to the rear profile. The configuration of the side-mounts was

 
 
1937 Bugatti Type 57
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